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Types of Diabetes

Types of Diabetes

Type 1:
Type 1 Diabetes, previously known as Juvenile Diabetes, is usually diagnosed in children and young adults. In Type 1 Diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches, and other food into energy needed for daily life. Only 5-10% of people with diabetes have this form of the disease.
With the help of insulin therapy and other treatments, even young children with Type 1 Diabetes can learn to manage their condition and live long and healthy happy lives.

Type 2:
Type 2 Diabetes is the most common form of the disease. Millions of Americans have been diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes, and many more are unaware that they are at high risk. Some groups have a higher risk for developing Type 2 Diabetes than others.
Type 2 Diabetes is more common in African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, other Pacific Islanders, as well as the aged population. Insulin is necessary for the body to use glucose for energy. In Type 2 Diabetes, either the body does not produce enough insulin, or the cells ignore the insulin. When you eat food, the body breaks down all of the sugars and starches into glucose, which is the basic fuel for the cells in the body.
Insulin takes the sugar from the blood into the cells. When glucose builds up in the blood instead of going into cells, it can lead to diabetes complications.

Source: American Diabetes Association, available at www.diabetes.org